Humanitarian response

Project Background and Description

Conflict in eastern part of Ukraine has affected around 5.2 million people. With the violence and insecurity intensifying in the conflict areas, many Ukrainians were forced to flee their homes and most of the internally displaced people (IDPs) from eastern Ukraine were located within Donetsk, Luhansk, Kharkiv, Dnipropetrovsk and Zaporizhzhia regions. IDPs, the majority of whom are women, children and disabled, remain the most vulnerable to discrimination, violence and abuse.

Project Background and Description

Conflict in eastern part of Ukraine has affected around 5.2 million people. With the violence and insecurity intensifying in the conflict areas, many Ukrainians were forced to flee their homes and most of the internally displaced people (IDPs) from eastern Ukraine were located within Donetsk, Luhansk, Kharkiv, Dnipropetrovsk and Zaporizhzhia regions. IDPs, the majority of whom are women, children and disabled, remain the most vulnerable to discrimination, violence and abuse.

In January 2015, UNFPA commissioned in-depth Needs Assessment in 16 oblasts of Ukraine to provide accurate information on the situation of women IDPs and older women, which confirmed that IDPs face various forms of violence including threat with weapon, psychological violence, sexual violence, intimidation and domestic violence. With the deterioration of the humanitarian situation, the incidents of GBV and domestic violence prevalence rates have increased and remain a major concern.

The overall objective of the Humanitarian Response Project is to address the issue of GBV in the situation of armed conflict trough strengthening of the multi-sectorial coordination, protection and prevention systems and enhancing access to legal, health and social-psychological care services for survivors of GBV. This also includes safe and timely access to quality essential services (inc. temporary solutions for shelters) for all (women, men, girls and boys) GBV survivors and enhanced awareness/availability of life saving information.

Project Objectives

  • Address immediate needs of GBV survivors through coordination, assessment of GBV prevalence, advocacy and multi-sectorial referral mechanism at the regional level;
  • Strengthen capacity of local service providers (legal protection, socio-psychological support, health care) to respond to GBV (including referral and provision of services to survivors) and implement community-level prevention programs.

Target Group and Location

IDP and local vulnerable population in Eastern Ukraine

Where do we work

The Project works in Kyiv and 5 regions of Eastern part of Ukraine: Kharkiv, Dnipropetrovsk, Zaporizhzhya, Donetsk and Luhansk (both GCA & NGCA)

Key Expected Results

 

  • Establishment of the GBV sub-cluster coordination at the central and regional level;
  • Multisectorial referral mechanism and regional SOP for GBV cases care provision;
  • Comprehensive GBV Assessment results;
  • Information and Awareness Campaign on GBV;
  • Enhanced capacities of law enforcement, health and social services;
  • Enhanced access to emergency SRH services including post-rape care and STI diagnostics and treatment.

Project Achievements

  • GBV sub-cluster was established with a coordination function at the regional level (Kyiv and 5 eastern regions: Kharkiv, Dnipropetrovsk, Zaporizhzhia, Donetsk/Kramatorsk and Lugansk/Severodonetsk). The sub-cluster includes over 70 organizations at central and regional levels. The work of the sub-cluster is supported by field monitoring specialists deployed to all regions
  • The Project is leading the process of development of the National Standard Operation Procedures (SOP) on inter-sectorial cooperation and referral to ensure prevention and response to GBV. The 3d draft of the SOPs (looking at the national legislation) is currently under review and expected to be adopted shortly
  • Development of the GBV Monitoring and Analysis System has been initiated through (1) conduct of the comprehensive GBV survey with the involvement of the international expertise that allowed to generate reliable GBV prevalence data; and (2) establishment of GBV Information Management System working group, under the GBV sub-cluster, consisting of service provider organizations that started collecting and analyzing existing practices and tools
  • Capacity development of humanitarian partners on GBV aspects and humanitarian response operations has been enhanced through (1) conduct of 5 workshops on Gender Equality in Humanitarian Action with a purpose to comprehensively cover Gender and GBV issues in humanitarian response context. The workshops took place in Kyiv, Dnipropetrovsk and Kharkiv, Severodonetsk, Kramatorsk in 2015; (2) collection of information and consolidation of findings on the referral pathway to identify existent gaps. As a result, an advocacy paper was produced by UNFPA to showcase the needs and recommendations to strengthen the referral pathway in Ukraine
  • In 2015 the Ministry of Social Policy of Ukraine has been supported with provision of two experts (GBV Policy advisor and Legal expert) with a purpose to strengthen its coordination and leadership role to respond to GBV and to address critical gaps in national GBV response mechanisms.
  • 57.800 GBV Referral Cards, containing all relevant contact information about service providers have been printed and distributed in the affected regions. They include 50 000 Referral Card Booklets and 7 800 Referral Card Posters for survivors who seek help
  • 180 000 target group specific materials on GBV were produced to equip service providers, social workers, young people, women and health service providers with information about GBV and ways to address it, including brochures for social workers, volunteers and psychologists on how to work with people touched by situation of armed conflict were distributed
  • 10 round tables and trainings for local media to sensitize regional media on speaking on cases of GBV conducted within “Break the circle” campaign
  • Social media campaign communicating information in GCA and NGCA launched in local networks and groups
  • 21 Mobile Teams (comprising of a psychologist, an outreach psychologist and a social worker) started providing psycho-social support in GCA, including to survivors of gender based violence. As of beginning of Aprial, over 4 000 survivors of different forms of violence received much needed support
  • 71 recruited staff for Mobile Teams were trained and equipped with additional skills and knowledge in managing stress, depression and post-conflict trauma, interpersonal conflicts, domestic and GBV, tolerance promotion, psycho-social adaption and rehabilitation as well as prevention of occupational burnout
  • 97 social-psychological service providers has gone through respective trainings on GBV
  • Over 600 Police Staff in affected regions were trained on SGBV management
  • Over 24 500 individual dignity kits, 355 reproductive health kits, 38 000 gynecological kits (ObGyn) and 8,600 packages with warm cloth were distributed in the regions with the highest numbers of IDPs.
  • 2.5 million additional male condoms to prevent STIs and HIV transmission procured within the framework of the project since the beginning of 2015
  • 2 infant incubators were procured and delivered to Krasnoarmejsk and Kramatorsk maternity hospitals, which will allow saving of up to 300 prematurely born infants each year
  • 600 health practitioners trained in RH kits distribution and provision of health services to GBV survivors
  • More than 120 health care providers trained on STI diagnostic and treatment
  • A free National Toll Free Hotline on prevention of domestic violence is, as of February 2016, available around the clock with a purpose to provide psychological counselling assistance to survivors of violence as well as run and update a database for consulting on the problem of domestic violence and GBV. Previously, help could only be reached by telophone during weekday hours, but since many violent attacks happen at night or on the weekend, this UNFPA supported extension of operating hours is vitally important. Number of phone calls to the hotline in January-March 2016 increased by almost 200% compared to 2015.

Partners of the Project

 

  • Ministry of Social Policy of Ukraine
  • Ukrainian Foundation for Public Health
  • Ukrainian Women's Fund
  • Women Health and Family Planning
  • Ukrainian Centre for Social Reforms
  • La Strada - International Women`s Rights Center

Project Funding

The Project is funded by the Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (via Department for International Development – DFID), United States Government (via the Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration of the U.S. Department of State - BPRM), and UNFPA:

  • United States Government contributed 1,000,000 USD
  • DfID contributed 500,000 GBP
  • UNFPA allocated 417,787 USD
  • UNAIDS contributed 73,440 USD